Classwork, IB US History–American Revolution-due before end of class on October 1.

You have an in class assignment today.  You will have choice of three distinct topics dealing with the American Revolution, found in your textbook Chapters 5 and 6.  Pick one of the three topics in the text and write a brief summary of the topic.  Then you are to write about your perceptions on the topic and why you  believe it is an important item to understand about U.S. History.  You will be assessed by historical accuracy.  You need to post nothing greater than 2 paragraphs.  The first paragraph is the summary, the second paragraph is to be your perceptions.  You are to post this assignment to my weblog as a post to this thread (aka, comment).   Remember to make sure your log in is in the form of first name, last initial (example:  Matthew E.)  I will know who you are.  I will compare absentee list to the list of those who submit and date stamp.  Late entries will not be accepted without prior approval.  This should be an easy A for a classwork/homework grade.  Sidenote:  your hcpslink grades are up to date.  When done, simply work at your desk quietly and deliberate on your thesis for your HI.  Also, check google calendar to see upcoming assessement dates for this class.

Topic 1:  Page 151, “The First Continental Congress”

Topic 2:  Page180, “Formalizing a Confederation”  Make sure to see appendix noted as well.

Topic 3:  Page 186, “The Philadelphia Convention, 1787″ Make sure to see appendix noted as well.

RSS feed | Trackback URI

76 Comments »

Comment by Michael N.
2009-10-01 10:10:10

The First Continental Congress was held in response to the British government’s passing of the Intolerable Acts on the 13 colonies. Every colony save Georgia sent delegates to Philadelphia to decide how they were going to respond to what they felt wasa an infringement on their rights. While there were many solutions presented, such as the “Grand Council” (essentially, a colonial governing body that would share power with the British Parliament) professed by Joseph Galloway. The final solution which was reached was a petition directed at King George III to repeal the Intolerable Acts and dismiss the ministers of Parliament responsible for their passing.

This event was important to history for two major reasons. One, it was the first real open act of resistance on the part of the colonies. By holding this congress, they were making decisions without the approval of Britain. Two, while not an open declaration of war, the realization that they had the ability to make decisions for themselves was a huge move toward the colonies’ eventual revolt.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Hannah R
2009-10-01 10:18:51

The First Continental Congress was made up of delegates from every colony except Georgia. It was held in Philadelphia on September 5, 1774 as a response to the Intolerable Acts and to find a way to protect the colonies’ rights. They voted to take defensive measures if they were attacked, to stop trade relations with Britain, and to ensure that the colonies understood that they weren’t bound to any of the acts passed by Britain. Some delegates that were opposed to the boldness of the others suggested that the colonies create a “Grand Council”, which would share powers to tax and govern with Parliament. The congress summarized all their decisions in a petition to the king.

When learning about US History, it is important to understand the First Continental Congress because it was the first meeting that the colonies held together in response to the Intolerable Acts. They shared their ideas on how it was unfair for Britain to govern them from across the ocean and decided that it was time that they act and resist Britain’s rule. It was the first time they all the colonies came together and the first time they officially decided to resist Britain’s rule. The congress was just the beginning of American resistance.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Valerie Westerman
2009-10-01 10:21:04

On September 5, 1774, the colonies reacted to the Intolerable Acts by meeting in Philadelphia. Each state sent delegates, with the exception of Georgia. They voted to boycott British goods and to cease all exports to Britain and the West Indies. As a summary of their demands, they created a petition to the King. The main purpose of this Congress was for the colonies to meet together and discuss rebellion and distaste against Britain.
This meeting is important because it pieced the revolutionary feelings of the colonies together, and it was their first step towards making a plan of action. This Congress catalyzed rebellious acts and when they wrote the petition, it was an observable gesture to the King. This showed Great Britain that the colonies had the capacity to band together, and it showed that there was a possibility of revolt. The First Continental Congress showcased the colonies’ displeased emotions and was a step forward for the future United States.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Arth P.
2009-10-01 10:24:22

The formalization of the Articles of Confederation took place from 1776 to 1781. When America decided to revolt against Britain they decided that they needed some kind of national government that reflected centralized authority. This Articles gave each state “its sovereignty, freedom, and independence and established a form of government in which Americas were citizens of their own states first and of the United States second. By 1781 all 13 state legislatures ratified the Articles, then establishing as a form of government.
I believe that the formation of the Articles of Federation constitutes an important part of America’s history. The Articles of Federation were the first type of national government that America actually had. Despite the fact that the Articles were later know to be weak, it is still the document that first created a sense unity in America. Also the Articles helped lay down the foundation of other legal documents such as the Constitution. These Articles of Confederation helped lay down some of the foundations of government that we have today.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Nikita B.
2009-10-01 10:25:02

The Philadelphia Convention took place in May 1787, with the gathering of established figures such as George Washington, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and Benjamin Franklin. The convention was organized to discuss major issues in the government of the United States of America. Firstly, great importance was given to the revision of the Articles of Confederation, in order to give more power to the national government. Also, the second fundamental problem they wished to address was how to balance voting rights between small and larger states. As a solution, James Madison proposed the Virginia Plan, which consisted of a bicameral legislature. According to the plan, the lower house would be elected by the people, and the upper house would be elected by the lower house. However, this plan benefited larger states, serving as a disadvantage for smaller states. As a counterproposal, the New Jersey Plan suggested a single house legislature with each state receiving an equal vote, regardless of population. As a result, both plans were opposed and the Connecticut Compromise was proposed. This stated that there would be a two house legislature, but the upper house would receive an equal vote and the lower house would be run under proportional voting. In the end, the Constitution was finally adopted on September 17, 1787, giving the national government more power than before and by adopting various ideas and systems that have shaped our lives even till today.

In my opinion, the Philadelphia Convention serves as the primary foundation of the United States Constitution, being a significant event that changed United States history. The simple gathering, at first, turned into an event that proposed the development of the US Constitution we follow today. It is seen as an important event to study as many new ideas and political practices/systems were introduced. For example, the weakened Articles of Confederation, which was revised during the meeting implemented a stronger national government that we still follow today. Also, the three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial branches were established during this time. This is very important for us today as it gives certain responsibilities to each branch, but also places restrictions on each branch. This system of checks and balances refrained from allowing a single branch to dominate, dividing the power amongst the branches equally. Finally, the concept of the conventoin is important to understand as it laid the foundation of shared power between the national government and the state government.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Caitlin S.
2009-10-01 10:26:05

John Dickinson drafted a document that established an American authority but gave almost all power to individual states. The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was then sent to all states to be ratified in 1777. By 1781, all 13 colonies had ratified the document. The Articles allowed states to function separately from the national government as the primary source of authority; the national government consisted solely of one body of Congress elected by state legislature in which each delegate had one vote. Its powers were very limited. No taxes could be instituted without the consent of all 13 states, states oversaw commerce, and smaller congressional committees controlled “financial, diplomatic, and military affairs.”

Although the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union marked an important step towards becoming a self-sufficient nation, the weakness of the national government was an apparent problem. It is important to study the document because it was the basis for the Constitution of the United States: it created the need for a stronger, centralized government as outlined in the Constitution and it forced the greatest minds of the time to begin thinking about the best way to govern and organize the new country. It acted as a “trial run.” After seeing what did not work for the country, the Continental Congress was able to remedy the problems and strengthen the government. We cannot fully appreciate the magnitude of the Constitution until we see where its roots lie.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Adam A.
2009-10-01 10:28:27

The First Continental Congress

After England passed the “Intolerable Acts” the colonists decided they had enough and sent delegates to the First Continental Congress. Every colony sent delegates except Georgia. The First Continental Congress met on September 5, 1774 in Philadelphia. The colonists decided to boycott all British goods and to stop exporting almost all goods to Britain and its West Indian possessions after September 1775 unless reconciliation was made. Not all of the delegates however agreed with this decision. Some delegates feared that this internal turmoil would cause a head-on confrontation with Britain. In the end the delegates summarized their demands in a petition to the king. The petition said all previous efforts of parliament to impose taxes, enforce laws through admiralty courts, suspend assemblies, and unilaterally revoke charters were unconstitutional.
This was an important part of U.S. history because the colonists began meeting and working together as one nation. This was the one of the first times the colonies met and decided on a solution. It seems that this would cause Britain to become worried because the colonists were taking a stand. It is important because this meeting was the first step of the Americans quest for independence. The petition they made at the meeting was meant to go to the King himself rather than parliament. If the colonists had not taken this first step towards independence there is a chance they would have never gotten their freedom.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Forrest, B.
2009-10-01 10:29:02

The continental congress was formed on September 5, 1774 in response to the “Intolerable Acts”. Fifty six delegates came together from all different colonies. The Congress opened by endorsing the Suffolk Resolves. The Congress also voted to boycott al British goods after December 1 and to cease exporting goods until reconciliation was accomplished. However, some of the delegates opposed this type of action. Some of the moderates at the meeting tried to win support for the “Grand Council”. In this plan an American legislature would share the right to tax and govern the colonies with Parliament. Basically, it would be a joint ruling and taxing effort. Finally, the congress petitioned to the King to change the taxes and the way laws were carried out throughout society.
The Continental Congress was very important to the breaking away from English rule. It was one of the first times that delegates from all the different colonies would come together and act upon the tyranny of King George the III. It also was a precursor to the Second Continental Congress, in which the Declaration of Independence was signed. The Continental Congress was one of the last times that the colonies would try to petition the King, after this they will try to break away.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Heather N.
2009-10-01 10:33:53

Delegates of each thirteen colonies, except Georgia, met at a conference in Philadelphia in response to the “Intolerable Acts” on September 5, 1774. Many of these men were influential and prominent leaders of the colonies, among these were; Samuel and John Adams, John Jay, Joseph Galloway, John Dickinson, Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, and George Washington. The reason for this gathering was for the fifty-six delegates to decide on a way of defending the colonies’ rights. The Congress began with the presentation of the Suffolk Resolves, which stated that the colonies owed no obedience to any of the Coercive Acts, that the provisional government should collect all taxes until the former Massachusetts charter was restored, and that defensive measures should be taken in the event of an attack by royal troops. The Congress also decided to boycott all British imports and to stop exporting goods to their mother country after December 1, unless an agreement had been reached. This agreement was to be enforced locally by elected committees of “observation” or “safety”. But not all of the delegates supported these decisions. They feared a so affirmative and head on collision with the British, and opposed by supporting the plan for a “Grand Council”. Finally the delegates summarized their grievances and demands of the king.
When the delegates met at Independence Hall for the meeting of the First Continental Congress they were making the ultimate decision to rebel against everything they had known. By rebelling against the “Intolerable Acts” enacted by their mother country the congress was creating conflict where it was due. In my perception of the excerpt and my knowledge of the matter, the congress was taking the necessary step for liberty and equality. The meeting itself was an act of tyranny; by simply speaking about rebellion they had already committed a crime against the crown. They felt suppressed and used, coerced into paying for a war that they barely fought in and were promised would already be payed for. Britain had overstepped its boundaries and had done injustice to its own people. The colonies rebelled by boycotting British goods and by refusing to export their own goods to their mother country. This open and head on confrontation with Britain set the stage for revolution between the colonies and the British. It was risky but necessary and in the end freedom was achieved.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Joseph Y
2009-10-01 10:36:23

In 1774, after the Boston Tea Party, Britain began passing a series of laws known as the Intolerable Acts. Americans were greatly displeased with these laws, so on September 4th, 1774, 56 delegates from all colonies save Georgia met in Philadelphia to hold the First Continental Congress. The delegates declared that they did not need to follow the Intolerable Acts, taxes should be collected by a provisional government, and that America should begin to build a militia in case the British attacked. The Congress agreed that British imports should be boycotted until peace had been reached. All of this was summarized in a letter to King George. The First Continental Congress, unlike the Second, simply argued for respect from Britain, but not independence.
The First Continental Congress was a significant precursor to the Revolutionary War. It was the first time the colonists had gotten together and petitioned against British rule. The refusal of Britain to comply with these requests caused elevated tension between Americans and British, and led to civil strife between Tories and Whigs. This Congress laid the foundation for the Second Continental Congress, when the Declaration of Independence was written.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Logan T
2009-10-01 10:37:19

The first continental congress was a meeting in Philadelphia in 1774 which every colony except for Georgia attended. The meeting was a response to the passing of the intolerable acts; the colonies were attempting to find a way to defend the colonies’ rights. The meeting was opened by authorizing the Suffolk Resolves which asserted that the colonies did not need to follow the Coercive Acts, a provisional government should collect all taxes, and if the royalists attacked the colonies, defensive actions would be taken. Also at the meeting, a petition was written to the king about the unconstitutionality of the taxes. However, not all of the colonists were supporters of the drastic actions being taken against Britain; they knew that a period of hardship would definitely befall the colonists if they were to take a stand against British rule.
This meeting was extremely important since the colonists finally decided to make a definitive effort to stand up to the British. They wanted to let the British king know that he had gone too far and they were not going to accept the new taxes and regulations that had been passed on them. This helped set the grounds for the revolution since it helped the delegates to convince the colonists that the British government had finally crossed the line. It helped colonists to realize that the leaders of their country were willing to stand up to Britain- even if the costs were large.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Eboni B.
2009-10-01 10:39:56

After the revolution the Americans needed a form of government. The ideas, that were thought of brought fear to the people of a centralized authority and possible corruption. John Dickinson proposed a constitution for the nation to follow. The Articles of Confederation were decided on seeing as they were a weaker version of what John Dickinson had written. This was sent off to be ratified by the states and ensured that each state had “its sovereignty, freedom and independence”. This article also included that the government was of one single chambered congress which was elected by the state legislature where states had one vote. All the states had ratified the Articles of Confederation by 1781.
The Articles of Confederation is very important to life in America today. It stands as the basis of the constitution in which we live by today. Seeing as the people were going to be governed by this document if passed it was necessary that the Articles of Confederation appealed to the majority of the people. It did, in fact become appealing to all of the states, being ratified by each. However as do most things not everyone agreed with such a thing governing them but the people had to live with what they were given.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Jessica S.
2009-10-01 10:44:38

Topic 1: Page 151, “The First Continental Congress”

The First Continental Congress assembled on September 5th, 1774. Delegates from the colonies, excluding Georgia, meet in Philadelphia in response to the Intolerable Acts. These 56 delegates consisted of the most prominent political figures found in the colonies. They examined the Suffolk Resolves, statements that set Massachusetts in a state of rebellion, and told the colonists they didn’t need to obey the Coercive Acts, taxes should be collected by a provisional government, and if British troops attacked the colonists should defend themselves. Also, the continental congress decided to boycott all British goods and their exports to the Britain and the West Indies. Others, however, were not completely thrilled with such strong measures. Moderates (known to some as “trimmers”) worried about a strong collision with Britain and attempted to gain the support of others in Galloway’s “Grand Council” plan. This plan suggested there be an American legislative that worked hand in hand with parliament in both taxes and government authority. In the end, all of the delegates came together and comprised their demands in a direct petition to the King. They argued that certain acts of Parliament, such as taxes and their enforcement of laws, were unconstitutional.

In my opinion, this meet was very influential and necessary for the colonies future freedom. Without the colonies uniting, their voice would not have been heard so strongly. Also, it would have been harder for the colonists to later be victorious over Britain without unity. America was just at the beginning of their realization that they deserved certain rights and Britain’s rule was detracting from them. These high standing intelligent men worked diligently for the rights of their people and their continuous deliberation comprised a universal opinion of the people.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Justin T.
2009-10-01 10:45:04

The Philadelphia Convention of 1787 was a secret meeting of fifty-five delegates from all of the states with the exception of Rhode Island. The primary issue that was debated was revising the Articles of Confederation due to its lack of power within the nation and between the states. In the convention, there were two main propositions to balancing power between large and small states. James Madison introduced the Virginia Plan which called for a strong central government instead of granting more power to the individual states. This gave Congress the authority to tax and to make laws, veto state laws, and use the military against the states. In addition, it would create a bicameral legislature (two houses) that would have representation from the states based on population. William Paterson opposed this plan with his New Jersey plan which proposed a one house congress in which states had an equal vote. In the end, both sides were considered during the creation of the Constitution of the United States. Some of the key items outlined in the Constitution include the three branches (executive, legislative, and judicial), equal representation in the Senate and proportional by population in the House, a system of checks and balances to ensure the balance of power between the three branches, and rules regarding slavery during that time. Most importantly, it recognized the people of the country to be the ultimate source of power and the constitution would be amendable as the nation faces new circumstances.
This historical convention developed the outline for the United States government as it is seen today. Knowing about this issue allows us to learn what the founding fathers were concerned about regarding the power of the states and the balance between large and small states. These conflicts they ran into ultimately led to the bicameral legislature, the balance of powers between the three branches, and the creation of many amendments that people see necessary to add as the nation continues to face new situations. It is also very important to know who developed many of these ideas and their reasoning behind them. Finally, I strongly agree with the compromise these important figures reached since it created the well-functioning and (relatively) efficient government we see today. The balance between the states is relatively equal and has proven to not show conflict between them. In addition, the system of checks and balances is key and also allows balance within the national government.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Brittany P.
2009-10-01 10:48:27

The First Continental Congress
On September 5, 1774, after the “Intolerable Acts” were passed, the first Continental Congress was held in an attempt to defend the rights of the colonies. Delegates were sent from every colony, besides Georgia, to participate in the First Continental Congress. George Washington, Patrick Henry, Joseph Galloway, John Jay, Richard Henry Lee, and Samuel Adams were the most famous politicians in attendance. The Suffolk Resolves were quickly established by the First Continental Congress shortly after it opened. Under the Suffolk Resolves, the Coercive Acts would not be obeyed by the colonies and all taxes would be collected by a provisional government until the restoration of the Massachusetts charter. The resolves also called for the colonies to defend themselves against any attacks made by the royal troops. Until Britain and the colonies reconciled, the congress also voted to stop exporting goods to Britain and its West Indian territories, as well as, after December 1, ceasing to buy any British goods. Galloway, Dickinson, among other moderates, disagreed with the idea of defying Britain and argued to have a “Grand Council.” In the end, the Congress sent a petition to the king with a list of demands.
The meeting of the First Continental Congress was very necessary. Many of the laws and regulations that Britain placed on the colonies were unconstitutional. This meeting gave the colonist the courage and confidence that was necessary in order to stand up to the crown. It is often said that two heads are better than one, and in this case the petition made by the Congress was a much stronger voice for the colonies than a small group of people would have been. Although the First Continental Congress did not give the colonies all of the freedoms that they wanted, it was a driving force that led to America’s Independence. It is important to understand the First Continental Congress, because it gives insight on one of the factors that led to the Revolutionary war.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Faye H.
2009-10-01 10:51:51

The beginnings of the United States as its own country began with the first draft of the American constitution, the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. John Dickinson wrote the proposal for this national constitution in 1776 and in 1777, sent it to the states for approval. Under the Articles of Confederation, each state has its own separate government, thus having their own freedom and independence. The citizens are first the people of their state and then they are the people of America. In other words, the majority of the power belonged to the states instead of the national government. Positions held in the national government are elected by the state legislatures, each state with one vote. Taxes could not be passed without the approval of all states. There was only a legislative branch, no executive branch to pass laws and no judicial branch to uphold laws within the states. In 1781, all thirteen states of the colonies ratified the articles, and thus began the first step of national sovereignty.
The Articles of Confederation is a very important document in the history of America. Not only was it the precursor of today’s Constitution, but it was one of the first signs that showed our full independence from the mother country of England. But the first drafts will always have its errors, the Articles of Confederation also held many errors and problems within its text. Under it, the thirteen states within America held the majority of the power. Without power to the national government, nothing would be able to be resolved due to the overpowering effect the states had to the government’s decisions. So, the Articles was also a basis of what was successful and unsuccessful during the beginnings of the United States. Without this document, our constitution today would not have been as effective as it is.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Sherae D.
2009-10-01 10:52:47

The First Continental Congress
In response to the Intolerable Acts, the committees of correspondence of every colony with the exception of Georgia sent delegates to a continental congress in Philadelphia, on September 5, 1774. Of those who attended were many of the colonies’ most important politicians such as: Samuel Adams and John Adams of Massachusetts; John Jay of New York; Joseph Galloway and John Dickinson of Pennsylvania; and Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, and George Washington of Virginia. The delegates (56) met on various occasions to help find a way to defend the colonies’ rights. The First Continental Congress opened by approving a set of statements of principle called the Suffolk Resolves that previously had placed Massachusetts in the state of rebellion. The resolves declared that the colonies owed no obedience to the Coercive Acts, that a provisional government should collect all taxes, and that defensive measures should be taken in the event of an attack by royal troops. The Continental Congress also decided to boycott any British good after December 1st and to stop the exporting of almost all of the goods to Britain as well as its West Indian possessions after September 1775 unless a reconcile had been accomplished. This decision although was opposed by some of the delegates of the Continental Congress. Finally the delegates summarized their principles and demands in a petition to the king.
This particular topic is the major spark to the independence of the colonies in America. This part is essential because the doings of The First Continental Congress somewhat enhanced the mindset of many Americans and better interpreted what was happening and what needed to be done in order to accomplish this. It is highly important to understand this topic in US History because was one of the basis in starting the US history. The meetings led to rebellions which led to the Declaration of Independence. Without this information incorporated into the study of US history individuals would not know or understand how this country came to be.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Teresa D.
2009-10-01 10:57:22

The topic on page 186 concerns the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. It discussed the matters that occurred in the Convention held with delegates from all states, fifty-five withholding Rhode Island. The matter at hand was determining a solution for the weakness of the Confederation: should the Articles of Confederation be amended or should a new constitution be devised to replace it? Furthermore, the convention debated on the matter of incorporating the interests of all the states, large and small. The latter devolved in further debate on representation and resulted in the creation of two plans: the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan. The Virginia plan was introduced by James Madison and favored a strong central government (and likewise large states, due to representation by population) as opposed to the Paterson devised New Jersey Plan which petitioned for equal votes per each state and thus favored smaller states. However, the intent of both plans was to strengthen the national government, although there were those that feared that the government could become to autocratic. Nonetheless, the Convention was able to come to an accord and approve a new constitution, the Constitution of the United States, on September 17, 1787. This document which is still in use today, provided a form of government that all states upheld and addressed concerns of the states, such as branches of government that function with checks and balances, a bicameral Congress of equal representation in one branch (Senate) and proportional representation of population by the other state. These among various other facets of government were providing in this ingenious document and the only thing left for the Convention to accomplish was its ratification.

It distinctly evident that the Constitution of the United States, created by the Philadelphia Convention in 1787, is an essential concept and event to understand in U.S. History. The matter deals with the founding of our country, independence, and formation of our government to which we abide today. Particularly, I was enthralled by the decision making process and debates conducted during the Convention. The pressure that was mounted on the shoulders of the men in order to devise a document that would run their country of thousand of inhabitants, seemed daunting in my opinion. I was especially shocked to know that as a young man, James Madison was able to devise a plan for establishing a government and representation in the country. From a holistic view, it is possible to commend and apply the processes that the Convention endured in order to provide a framework for this country: the ingeniousness of their thinking, determination displayed in deliberating topics, and the courage the men possessed in order to carry out their plans. From this reading, I attained insight on a document, that many of us take for granted, about how its process and the product can be considered as one of the greatest achievements in the course of United States History.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Barbara R
2009-10-01 11:24:30

Barbara Roessle 3rd period 10/01/09

The First Continental Congress

The First Continental Congress can be seen as the colonist’s response to the “Intolerable Acts”. In September 1774 delegates from all colonies except for Georgia met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to work out a way to defend the colonies together. For instance they decided to boycott all British goods and to stop export to Britain. Such big irreverence led to disagreement among the delegates as they feared the British reaction and expected more riots. Golloway’s idea of a “Grand Council”, a legislature sharing the power to tax and govern the colonies with the British Parliament, had no success. At the end a petition was written to the king George III, asking him to dismiss the ministers responsible for the Coercive Acts in order to stop the crises.

The First Continental Congress in 1774 was the first step to Independence. The idea of getting together with representatives from all colonies was definitely a key to success. Doubtless it would have been impossible or at least much harder to achieve independence if every colony tried on its own.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Alexandra V. 2nd
2009-10-02 08:29:06

The First Continental Congress was held on September 5th, 1774 by the colonists of the thirteen colonies after England passed the “Intolerable Acts.” There were fifty-six delegates in all, some of the more famous being Samuel and John Adams of Massachusetts, Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, and George Washington of Virginia. They first enforced a set of principles that was named the Suffolk Resolves. It declared that a provisional government of the colonies had the right to collect taxes, not England, and that the colonies should take defensive strategies when attacked by the Royal troops. There was also a plan for a “Grand Council”; it was a legislature that would work with Parliament instead of against it and share the authority to tax and govern the colonies in the New World. The delegates from the thirteen colonies decided, in conclusion, to create a petition against the King of England. The document kept Parliament’s power to regulate the trade within the colonies and between other countries, but it let the colonies enforce laws and impose taxes.
In my personal opinion, the colonies meeting of the First Continental Congress was extremely important for the budding future of the nation. The meeting explored their ability to run a ‘government’ like environment as well as ultimately unite together as one nation. Without the unity between the colonies, it would have been more difficult for the nation to sustain the British during the war. It also gave the colonists confidence and a sense of freedom in a way, for they were going against their mother country. The men that were a part of the First Continental Congress worked together as one unit, as a nation should, and fought for the freedom that they deserved from the King and Parliament.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Nick T
2009-10-02 08:37:49

The First Continental Congress, as a response to the Intolerable Acts, was held on September 5, 1774 in Philadelphia. Fifty six delegates from the Thirteen Colonies attended in order to achieve the goal of forming some type of rights to the colonies. The colonists discussed how they would plan to form a government for the people and about the Suffolk Resolves. The Suffolk Resolves had recently caused a minor passive rebellion in Massachusetts. The colonists also came up with a provisional army of sorts in case of attack by Royal troops. To send a statement, The First Continental Congress also voted to boycott any imported goods Britain and they stopped supplying goods to Britain and the West Indies shortly after. The First Continental Congress did not go without a little bit of opposition from the middle colonies. The final plan was drawn up and submitted in the form of a petition to the king which highlighted the fact that the colonists were being unfairly taxed, unfairly enforced by British laws, and that Britain’s charters were unconstitutional.
This was one of the most important meetings in the history of the United States of America. I feel that by holding a meeting with fifty six delegates, the colonists were sending a message to Britain that they meant business. The beginning of the meeting was focused on internal affairs which were important to address. The fact that the colonists also drew up plans for a provisional army was an immaculate step. This showed that they were preparing to fight for any freedom from British rule and knew a conflict would be imminent. When the petition was submitted to the King, the wheels were set in motion for the colonists to fight for their freedom and eventually gain it from Britain.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Nick T - 2nd Period
2009-10-02 08:38:05

The First Continental Congress, as a response to the Intolerable Acts, was held on September 5, 1774 in Philadelphia. Fifty six delegates from the Thirteen Colonies attended in order to achieve the goal of forming some type of rights to the colonies. The colonists discussed how they would plan to form a government for the people and about the Suffolk Resolves. The Suffolk Resolves had recently caused a minor passive rebellion in Massachusetts. The colonists also came up with a provisional army of sorts in case of attack by Royal troops. To send a statement, The First Continental Congress also voted to boycott any imported goods Britain and they stopped supplying goods to Britain and the West Indies shortly after. The First Continental Congress did not go without a little bit of opposition from the middle colonies. The final plan was drawn up and submitted in the form of a petition to the king which highlighted the fact that the colonists were being unfairly taxed, unfairly enforced by British laws, and that Britain’s charters were unconstitutional.
This was one of the most important meetings in the history of the United States of America. I feel that by holding a meeting with fifty six delegates, the colonists were sending a message to Britain that they meant business. The beginning of the meeting was focused on internal affairs which were important to address. The fact that the colonists also drew up plans for a provisional army was an immaculate step. This showed that they were preparing to fight for any freedom from British rule and knew a conflict would be imminent. When the petition was submitted to the King, the wheels were set in motion for the colonists to fight for their freedom and eventually gain it from Britain.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Rebecca 2nd period S.
2009-10-02 08:39:19

The first national government, defined by the Articles of Confederation were a weak central power. Because of the fear of one single entity ruling as the King had, the Articles of Confederation stated that each state had “its soveriengty, freedom, and independence” giving little strength to the national government over the Americans. The national government had one chamber of Congress that was controlled by the states. There was no power to tax without state consent and no regulation of trade overseas, which provided no money for the national government. This proposal, written by John Dickinson, was ratified by 1781 and the Continental Congress was in place.

In my opinion the Articles of Confederation were a way to pacify the fears of the American people who were fighting a war to protect the oppresion from another nation. The document was not beneficial to the federal government making it seem like a farse, but under the circumstances understandable.By reading the article on the formulization of the Articles of Confederation I better understand the neccesity of this weaker form of government before uniting as a nation. Because of this document the realization that as a unified country the states would be more powerful was a prominent possibilty.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Daniel 2nd period H.
2009-10-02 08:40:55

On September 5, 1774, the First Continental Congress, consisting of delegations sent from each of the colonies except Georgia, convened in Philadelphia to discuss the “Intolerable Acts” passed by Parliament. Many of the prominent politicians of the time, such as John Jay, Joseph Galloway, John Dickinson, Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, and George Washington were present. The Congress’ first action was to support the Suffolk Resolves, a document adopted by Massachusetts that stated that the colonies did not need to comply with the Coercive Acts; that taxes should go to a provisional government; and that if British troops attack the colonies as a result, defensive measures should be taken. The delegates voted to boycott British goods and to stop exporting goods to Britain and the West Indies. However, not all delegates supported this; some more moderate delegates known as “trimmers” were in opposition to the boycott and tried to put into place Joseph Galloway’s plan for an American-based “Grand Council” to share legislative power with Parliament. In the end, the delegates put all of their requests in a petition addressed to the king.
This meeting was important because it was one of the last attempts by the colonists to compromise with the British before going into all-out war. It united many of the colonies’ prominent voices and enforced the idea that something needed to be done about the British. It showed that although many people still opposed independence, the resistance group was slowly leaning towards this direction. This initial union of the colonies poised them for success in their efforts, for they would not have been able to stand up to the British alone.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Andrew P. 2nd Period
2009-10-02 08:41:33

The first Continental Congress met in Philadelphia on September 5, 1774. They met in order to defend the colonies rights after the passing of the Intolerable Acts. There were a total of 56 delegates from every colony, except Georgia. During the Continental Congress they voted to boycott all British goods after December 1. They also agreed to stop exporting almost all goods to the British after September 1775. These new rules were to be enforced by elected committees. A petition to the king was then written; stating that British attempts to tax, enforce laws, stop assemblies, and revoke charters was unconstitutional.
This first Continental Congress is an important concept to understand about US History because it was the colonists’ first real attempt to stand up to the British Government. It let the British Government know that they were not going to abide by the unfair British rules any longer. Trade with the British would also be stopped due to the unfair rule of the British Government. The Continental Congress was also the mark of the beginning of the American Revolution.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Christine 2nd Period T.
2009-10-02 08:45:33

After the signing of the Declaration of Independence and the withdrawal from Britain, the colonists feared a centralized government due to the possibility of corruption; however, John Dickinson proposed a national document that would list the rules that were to be followed. Although the Congress created a weaker form of his document, it was still ratified in 1781, called the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The second article of the document explicitly stated that “Each State retains its sovereignty, freedom and independence…” in which the American citizens were state citizens before national citizens. This article stated that each of the states was to have its own government, and if the unicameral Congress wanted to tax the state, it would have to have the consent of that state beforehand. Congress also could not control the state interstate or overseas commerce. This government however was only a legislative body with no executive or judicial branch.

Although the Articles of Confederation failed, this document still shows the initiative that the United States took in order to “form a more perfect union.” The Articles defined a state government and a national government, but these two bodies still worked as one, even though the states held more power. Despite its failure, it was essential to our government because it helped pioneer the creation of the Constitution. As a result, without the Articles which led to the Constitution, the US would not have an equally three-branched government, both national and state.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Stephaine "Second Period" D.
2009-10-02 08:47:28

John Dickinson proposed a plan for a nation constitution. Congress created the Articles of Confederation from his idea. Under the Articles of Confederation each state was sovereign (Americans were citizens to the state before the nation). Under the Articles there was no executive branch or judicial system. Nevertheless, all thirteen colonies ratified the Articles by 1781. This was a big step towards national recognition; however, the lack of a centralized government would hold them back in the minds of some of the elite nations.

The Articles of Confederation was a significant part in the history of America. Without the trial and error of this document our founding fathers would not have had the knowledge of what would work in the Constitution. Granted the Constitution still has to be revised when issues arise. The frame works such as the Articles of Confederation gave us the somewhat stable government we have now. Nothing is perfect we must grow from our mistakes.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Stephany Y. Period 2
2009-10-02 08:48:46

After finally gaining independence, the colonists believed it would not be in the country’s best interest to have a strong centralized government. John Dickinson wrote a proposal that, when modified, became the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. It allowed each state to have its own government. The colonists’ loyalty belonged to their states first and their country second. The people were not trying to unite the country as a single entity, but instead they wanted to be a “Confederacy of States” where each state would have its own government. The national government had little power under the Articles. Congress could not tax the states without every state’s approval. The national government could not control the trade that was going on both in the country and between countries. It was only able to be in charge of “financial, diplomatic, and military affairs.” There was neither an executive branch nor a judicial branch from which the national government could draw power. The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was situated within all thirteen colonies by 1781.

While the Articles of Confederation may not have worked as well as the colonists had hoped, it set the stage for the Constitution that we have today. When it was ratified, it was what the people wanted. They did not want another strong centralized government that could potentially cause the colonies to be under the same type of government that they had fought so hard to be free of. It was important that they went through the Articles of Confederation so that they could understand what type of government would work and what would not.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Tony 2nd Period H.
2009-10-02 08:49:27

In 1774, delegates sent by committees of correspondence from all of the 13 colonies (barring Georgia) held meetings of the Continental Congress in order to defend the rights of the colonies by discussing the “Intolerable Acts” and settling on a formal response to King George III. Discussion first turned towards the Suffolk Resolves, which stated that the colonies shouldn’t be obligated to obey the Coercive Acts, that a provisional government should be in charge of tax collection until the Massachusetts charter was restored, and that the colonies should be prepared to defend themselves in the event that royal troops attacked. Decisions were also made to boycott British goods and cease exporting colonial goods to the mother country and her other territories. Some delegates, wary of the negative effects of a confrontation with Britain, imposed this trade freeze by suggesting the establishment of a “Grand Council”, which would govern and tax the colonies in cooperation with Parliament. However, all fifty-six delegates soon agreed to send a statement to King George III that expressed their dissatisfaction with the taxation, law enforcement, and revocation of charters which they deemed “unconstitutional.”

It is important to know the actions of the First Continental Congress because their meetings were some of the first instances of organized cooperation among delegates in the colonies. Not only were many of the involved individuals important to the American Revolution (Samuel and John Adams, Patrick Henry, George Washington, etc.), but the statement that they sent to the king was perhaps one of the first formal statements made to the British crown concerning the colonies and their struggle with the rules and regulations being imposed upon them. I think that the actions of the First Continental Congress were important to the history of the United States because they would soon prove to be one of the catalysts for the Revolutionary War and American independence.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Jessica 2nd Period B
2009-10-02 08:49:55

The First Continental Congress met in response to the “Intolerable Acts.” Delegates from every colony, except Georgia, met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on September 5, 1774. Some of the most important attendants were Samuel Adams, John Adams, John Jay, Joseph Galloway, John Dickinson, Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, and George Washington. Overall, there were fifty-six delegates that all joined together in order to fight for their rights. The Continental Congress decided to boycott all British goods and to cease exporting goods to Britain as well. However, these bold defying acts were not accepted by all delegates. John Jay, John Dickinson, and Joseph Galloway thought these rebellious acts would result in turmoil between Britain and the colonies. Eventually all of the delegates agreed on their principles and summarized them in a petition to the King.
In my opinion, this uniting of the colonies against the king was a turning point in their steps towards freedom. They all finally agreed on one topic and wrote something to the king, protesting his ways. This was a very important meeting because this is when the colonies finally got a voice in what was happening to them and how they were being treated. It would have been much more difficult for the colonies to make a statement if they were fighting against the king one colony at a time. Their idea to come together was innovative and it made them much more powerful against the king. They had the goal of freedom and protecting their common rights and they did what was necessary to accomplish their goal.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Gina 2nd period V.
2009-10-02 08:52:35

Forming a Confederation
At this point of time, America is revolting against Britain. Still in the early state o of the constitution, they have just formed their first national government and sign the Declaration of Independence. However, many people fear this new government authority for it has the potential to corrupt. To fix the problem, John Dickinson drafted another proposal and congress adopted the proposal after they weaken it. This proposal is known as the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The Article gives power to each state to establish their form of government. The national government is allowed to request funds but they couldn’t tax the state without approval of the states. The Articles was ratified in 1781 and it was set in place.
I consider the Articles of Confederation to be an important part of our history. The Articles of Confederation was good to some extent. It was important because it was use to unify the country by assuring the people that the government can’t corrupt. This also help keep the country unify. It also got the country through the American Revolution. When the war was done, problems started to emerge with the Articles. The Articles weakened the national government and gave too much power to the states. America had adopted a Confederation, which in my opinion is the weakest form of government there is. This was an important mistake because helped with revising a new and improved government.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Bradley Period 2 G.
2009-10-02 08:53:37

During the French and Indian War, colonists were promises, by the British, that they did not have to cover the cost for the war. After the war, the British started taxing the colonies on things such as paper and tea. This did not sit well with the colonists. They held many boycotts, such as the Boston Tea Party. They called these taxes and over-controlling acts the “Intolerable Acts.” In 1774, twelve of the thirteen colonies sent representatives to a Continental Congress in Philadelphia. They delegates at the Congress meeting came together to find a way of protecting the colonies rights from British influence. The Continental Congress voted to boycott all British goods to stop the economies export of goods as well as money to Great Britain. The Congress summarized their demands in a petition to the King of England (Not Parliament). The petition outlined the Colonies basic beliefs that all British influence and power to enforce laws and impose taxes was unconstitutional.
I believe that it is important to know this historical fact because if this issue had not occurred, then there is a possibility that Britain could have kept the influence over America’s government and indefinitely, the society as a whole. This issue was the first time that the colonies as a whole actually came together and tried to politically fight of the British rule over the New World’s colonies. Also, this was the result of the first realization that the Britain’s strict rule over laws and economics in the Thirteen Colonies was unacceptable.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Anonymous
2009-10-02 08:54:51

In May of 1787, delegates from every state of the union excluding Rhode Island met to discuss the nation’s government. There were two major issues the delegates faced during their time at the Philadelphia Convention: whether to ratify the Articles of Confederation or replace the Articles all together and whether to allow more representation to the smaller states or the larger states. Through much discussion, the fifty-five delegates of the Philadelphia Convention made the decision to scratch the Articles all together and proposed to write an entirely new Constitution. The second concern the delegates dealt with was the issue of representation. There were two plans drawn up to eliminate this conflict, the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan. The Virginia Plan, drafted by James Madison, called for a strong central government that was controlled by the states with the largest populations. The New Jersey, introduced by William Paterson, called for a government in which all the states represented in congress were to have one equal vote. Through a series of other debates and debacles, the Constitution of the United States was finally approved on September 17, 1787.
The Philadelphia Convention was extremely important for many obvious reasons. Because of the discontent provided by the Articles of Confederation, the only resolution to the problem was to draft and hopefully approve an entirely new national constitution document. The new Constitution provided national power that the Articles of Confederation did not give. The national government or the United States Congress now had the power to “lay and collect taxes, to regulate interstate commerce, to conduct diplomacy,” and to “use military force against any state.” The results of this convention provided ideas that are still used and examined today.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Tahseen 2nd R.
2009-10-02 08:55:27

The Philadelphia Convention of 1787 was essentially the meeting of fity-five delegates from every state (except Rhode Island) for the purpose of laying basic governmental foundation to the country. The delegates tasked themselves with revising the Articles of Confederation and with balancing the power between the states. The delegates consisted mostly of young, but educated wealthy men. Much debate was involved, such as varying support and opposition between Madison’s Virginia Plan and Paterson’s New Jersey’s plan. In the end, the Constitution considered all debates in order to make a reasonable compromise. The Constitution endowed Congress with the ability to tax, regulate interstate commerce, and conduct diplomacy. Also established was a system of checks and balances and seperation of powers within the national government. This meant that the central goverment was divided into three branches: Judicial, Executive, and Legislative, and no branch held more power over another. As for state representation, the Constitution held that within the bicameral Congress, there would be equal representation within the Senate, and proportional representation (by population) within the House. The acknowledged flexibility and amendability and recognization of the people as the “ultimate source of political legitimacy” were also key aspects of the Constitution.

The Philadelphia Convention is not a mere footnote in U.S. history. The Constitution provided a basic framework and outline, which the U.S. still adheres to, and allows the citizens to continually make amendments should the country need it. Balances applied between the states and the governmental branches have to date ensured that no conflict should arise. These balances have also allowed the government to act in an ordered manner.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Barbara K (P. 2)
2009-10-02 08:55:38

In May of 1787, delegates from every state of the union excluding Rhode Island met to discuss the nation’s government. There were two major issues the delegates faced during their time at the Philadelphia Convention: whether to ratify the Articles of Confederation or replace the Articles all together and whether to allow more representation to the smaller states or the larger states. Through much discussion, the fifty-five delegates of the Philadelphia Convention made the decision to scratch the Articles all together and proposed to write an entirely new Constitution. The second concern the delegates dealt with was the issue of representation. There were two plans drawn up to eliminate this conflict, the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan. The Virginia Plan, drafted by James Madison, called for a strong central government that was controlled by the states with the largest populations. The New Jersey, introduced by William Paterson, called for a government in which all the states represented in congress were to have one equal vote. Through a series of other debates and debacles, the Constitution of the United States was finally approved on September 17, 1787.
The Philadelphia Convention was extremely important for many obvious reasons. Because of the discontent provided by the Articles of Confederation, the only resolution to the problem was to draft and hopefully approve an entirely new national constitution document. The new Constitution provided national power that the Articles of Confederation did not give. The national government or the United States Congress now had the power to “lay and collect taxes, to regulate interstate commerce, to conduct diplomacy,” and to “use military force against any state.” The results of this convention provided ideas that are still used and examined today.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Shantel_2nd Period_B
2009-10-02 08:56:44

The First Continental Congress

On September 5, 1774 the First Continental Congress was established to respond to the Intolerable Acts in Philadelphia. Every colony was present during this time to discuss the rights of the colony in agreement with the thirteen colonies that were attending. The colonies did not believe in the Coercive Acts and did not want anything to do with them. The Coercive Acts or the Intolerable Acts is the British government making four acts to state their authority. Therefore, the thirteen colonies wanted to refrain and stop trading goods from Britain. The Galloway’s plan “Grand Council” was about taxing and the right to govern the colonies through Parliament. This was said to be unconstitutional charters.
Overall, the First Continental Congress was every colonies chance to come together and make common rights amongst each other. Since this was the first time each colony came together it is very important in history. It’s important to me because many of the colonies did not want to spark tension against Britain. This meeting clarified all of the tension amongst the different colonies and how they can come together and establish charters that were agreeable. I believe taking an initiative to the situation among Britain was very productive.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by anastasiapperiod2
2009-10-02 08:57:21

Topic 1: “The First Continental Congress”
The first continental congress was held as a result of the Coercive Acts, which pushed the colonies to an almost rebellious state. The representative of every colony but Georgia went Philadelphia to discuss the issue of the colonists’ freedoms and rights. In attendance were members appointed by the legislatures of the twelve of colonies. Among the party, politicians such as Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, and George Washington were present. The matter first discussed was one of the Suffolk Resolves, which stated that it was the colonists’ right to not abide to the Coercive Acts , and that a measure of defense should be considered in case of a royal attack . Congress came to agreement, the Continental Association, an economic boycott all British products after the 1st of December and to discontinue all exportation of goods to Britain unless an accord could be accomplished. These rules were to be enforced local representatives. As a result the colonists summarized their grievances in a petition to the king. For further enforcement, the convention called for a Second Continental Congress in case their first petition was not successful.

In my opinion the first continental congress played an immense role in the history of the United States. It served as a precursor to the American Revolution, by uniting the colonies and determining the natural rights of the citizens. Since the colonies were pushed to the “brink of rebellion”, I think that holding the Congress was necessary in order to formulate their complaints into a petition against for the king. This was an onset of to the great American Revolution .

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by 2nd Palak S
2009-10-02 08:59:56

On September 5, 1774, delegates from each of the colonies except Georgia met in Philadelphia because of the unconstitutional taxes that were being placed on the colonials and their rights. Although there were many different viewpoints and solutions, each of the delegates came with the same motive, to stop this injustice. The congress began by placing the Suffolk Resolves in action. These statements, already adopted by Massachusetts, stated that the colonies did not have to follow the Coercive Acts, that a temporary government should collect taxes, and that a militia should be formed for defense. The delegates also decided to boycott the British goods and to stop exporting British goods. With all of these changes, there were three delegates of the Middle Colonies who opposed these ideas. They did not agree with boycotting and ceasing English goods and also tried to implement Galloway’s plan for a “Grand Council.” With all these differences, the delegates created a petition to the king. They informed him that enforcing taxes and laws were unconstitutional.
In my opinion, I agree with the acts taken upon by the Continental Congress. It was time for them to take action. I think that the petition they sent helped the king understand that these colonies were not going to take anything and they knew when things were becoming injustice. I think that because they decided to form an army, they were fully prepared for the battle at Lexington and Concord and the war. Also it is reasonable for the delegates from the Middle Colonies to oppose these ideas because of the instant changes. This first meeting helped to continue their freedom fight.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Emily C
2009-10-02 09:00:49

Emily C. Period 2 – 10/2/09

The First Continental Congress was called together on September 5, 1774 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This assembly was formed as a response to the “Intolerable Acts” imposed on the colonies in North America, which set unfair laws on these individuals. All of the thirteen colonies, with the exception of Georgia, met to discuss methods in which they could defend their rights’ as colonists. They rapidly began by creating declarations such as the Suffolk Resolves, which reinstated that the colonies no longer had to obey the Intolerable Acts set by the Britain Parliament. The assembly also agreed on the Continental Association. By embargoing all goods from Britain as of December 1, 1774 and stopping all exported goods to Britain and West Indian tenures as of September 1775, the thirteen colonies would gradually be able to gain their control over trade back. After generating these plans with a failed attempt at shared authority with Britain, delegates of the First Continental Congress eventually decided to request that King George III oust all individuals responsible for passing the Coercive Acts previously set on the colonists.
This collaborated gathering in fall of 1774 is imperative to US History because it was the first stride of independence for the colonies of North America. By creating their own rules set apart from the ones assigned by the British Parliament, the colonists were able to interpret their own ideas and thoughts on how the United States should be led, and put these beliefs into action. Although these meetings often resulted in certain uprisings and disagreements, the assembly ultimately helped form the overall idea of Independence and freedom for the United States, later expressed through the American Revolution and Declaration of Independence in mid-1776.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Andrew S. Block 2
2009-10-02 09:02:34

In 1776, John Dickinson, a politician from Pennsylvania, drafted the one of the first proposals for a national constituion. He believed that America’s constitution should reestablish the rights of the colonists that had been threatened by Parliment, however, he also understood that America would need all the help it could get for the war with England, a far more powerful nation, so he designed his constitution to give specific powers to the Constituional Conference and Washington to deal with the war emergency. Congress sent a weaker version of Dickinson’s proposal, now called the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, out to the states for ratification in 1777. The Articles allowed each individual state to retain “its sovereignty, freedom, and independence.” The Articles created a single-chamber Congress which was elected by the state legislatures. This Congress was very weak and couldn’t create its own taxes, regulate commerce, or have a judicial or executive branch. Every state had ratified the Articles of Confederation by 1781.

While the Articles of Confederation were a very useful tool to have at this particular point in history, I don’t think that they could have been more successful if they had included a federal government. However, while they were ratified the war for American Independence was underway so the states were given more powers to deal with the war. That way they didn’t have to confer with a federal government about what to do, but they could decide for themselves. However, I think that Dickinson always assumed that federal governments were tyrannical rather than being useful to the overall good of the country. These sentiments very possibly could have come from being unfairly taxed by the British prior to the Revolution. However, the Articles created the first formal government of The United States of America and for the first time defined it as an individual nation.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Sydney G.
2009-10-02 10:32:17

Topic 2: Formalizing a Confederation
After the Revolutionary War the Americans’ created their first national government and constituntion. John Dickinson drafted a proposal, and Congress chose the weakened version, The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. Thes Articles left the states their “sovereignty, freedom, and independence” which meant that the citizens were loyal to their own states then the United States of America. The national government had a Congress where each state had a single vote. By 1781 all of the states had ratified the Articled, which limited those who thought the states should be more united.

I see the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union as a step before being able to reach the Constitution we have today. The Articles were the best way to free the people of the fear of an overpowerful government. I feel that it was important to have the Articles of Confederation, otherwise our government system would be either wholey national or wholey state, not the balance we have now under the COnstitution.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Kabir S
2009-10-02 10:35:34

On September 5, 1774 every colony except Georgia sent delegates to the First Continental Congress. This meeting was in response to the British “Intolerable Acts”. During the meeting they made several key decisions, such as boycotting British goods and stopping all exports to Britain. Along with this they created a petition which was to be sent to the king and spoke of possible rebellion.
This is an important part of our history because it shows the first time that the colonies organized in an attempt to defy their mother country. This showed that they were capable of thinking for themselves and would not tolerate any unfairness that was directed towards them. In addition it sent a message of disapproval towards the King, and let him know that he would have to try harder to please his colonies or face further consequences.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Robbie P
2009-10-02 10:37:53

The First Continental Congress was held on September 5, 1774 in Philadelphia in response to the “Intolerable Acts”. This gathering included all of the colonies except for Georgia, and held some of the most important politicians, such as George Washington. During the First Continental Congress, the Suffolk Resolves were read aloud, which declared that the colonies did not have to obey the Coercive Acts, that defensive measures should be taken in case of an attack from the royal troops, and that a provisional government should collect all taxes until the former Massachusetts charter was restored. In addition, the members of the Continental Congress voted to boycott all of the British goods and to stop exporting almost all of their goods to Britain and its territories. Finally, the delegates summarized all of these principles and demands as a petition to the king, not the Parliament.

This meeting of delegates is a highly important element of history to study, because it was one of the main contributing factors to the beginning of the Revolutionary War. Also, the First Continental Congress showed how the power of the people can have a large influence on the course of history.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Philip A. F.
2009-10-02 10:39:57

First Continental Congress
Delegates from each of the thirteen colonies (minus Georgia) assembled in Philadelphia in order to decide upon a course of action against Parliament regarding the Intolerable Acts. Several delegates supported a policy of bold defiance, while the delegates from the Mid-Atlantic colonies supported a policy of coexistence and rule with Parliament. In the end, the delegates wrote a letter directly to King George III in order to bypass Parliament in general, and see if the King would solve their problems.
This Congress was important in U.S. history in that it showed that the colonists were ready and able to compromise with the British crown, so long as the crown was willing to treat the colonists as true British citizens.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Sarah B.
2009-10-02 10:44:14

The first Continental Congress was established in response to the British parliament’s “Intolerable Acts.” Delegates from most of the colonies convened in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, including some of the most famous politicians of the Colonial Era. The congress finalized their opinion on these acts and deemed them unnecessary. They expressed their complaints in an official petition to the current monarch of England, King George III.
This Continental Congress was unquestionably essential to the development of the United States legal system. The basic principles of democracy were highly involved in the formation of this Continental Congress, and it seems to be the basis for the Congress in the United States today. Without these pioneering politicians of the 1770’s, we would not have the powerful politicians and government that we have today.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by William S.
2009-10-02 10:44:50

William S
Mr. Engel
Period 4
10/2/09
American Revolution

Topic 1: Page 151, “The Continental Congress”
The Continental Congress was called so that the colonists could discuss the intolerable acts. Representatives from every colony but Georgia were present. They began the meeting by endorsing the Suffolk Resolves which states that Massachusetts owed no obedience to the Coercive Acts and that a provisional government would collect taxes until the former measurements were reinstated. A few delegates wanted to implement a different plan in which they would establish a “Grand Council” or an American government that would share the right to tax with the Parliament. They wanted to do this because they thought trying to attack Parliament head on would end in their downfall. In the end, they wrote a letter to King George III to end the tax that was established by the ministers of Parliament.
This is important to understand about U.S. history because it shows that the colonists did not want to secede from the crown originally. They thought that if they talked to King George III then he would abolish the offending law.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Bindu S.
2009-10-02 10:45:15

Prominent politicians from each of the colonies, with the exception of Georgia,gathered together in Philedelphia for the First Continental Convention. Their purpose was to discuss the Inotlerable Acts and to find a way of defending the colonies’ rights. They voted to boycott all British goods all B ritish goods and to cease exporting almost all goods to Britain and the West Indies. These rules would be enforced by locally elected “observation”. Not all people thought this was a good idea, they were worried it would start a fight with Britain. They were more in favor of a “Grand Council” which would be an American legislature that would share the authority to tax and govern the colonies in Parliament. The delegates finally decided to just send a letter to teh King naming their grievances.
It seems to me that there were two sides at the First Continental Congress. One side was, in my opinion, extremely reckless and seemed to be picking a fight with a world power. The other side seemed to be pretty passive abd was willing to just compromise with Britain.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Isaiah C.
2009-10-02 10:48:27

A document was drafted by John Dickinson in 1776 to be ratified by all states except for Georgia. The document was to preserve the rights of the states separately from each other while still being unified. Each colony sent delegates to convene as a national Congress in which each state had one vote. The Articles of Confederation perserved the rights of each state ad unified them in a way that financial and military affairs had to be agreed upon by all 13 states.

The Articles of Conderderation was the beginning of the states becoming a centralized government. It was the first step to becoming a strong nation by unifiying the best minds of their time. The Articles was the basis for a strong centralized government while maintaining the rights of each state individually. Government today has its roots from the document ratified in 1777 by 13 states.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Mithunan G
2009-10-02 10:48:53

The First Continental Conference
The first continental congress was formed on September 5th, 1774 by delegates from each state except for Georgia. The reason behind the convention was to discuss England’s decision for placing certain taxes on the Colonies. They decided that they wanted to boycott all English goods and to stop all exporting of goods to Britain. They also endorsed a set of principle named the Suffolk Resolves. These ‘resolves’ were against England’s Coercive Acts.
My perception of The First Continental Congress is that it was a good idea for the colonies to break away from the grasps of English rule. I liked their idea of boycotting the taxes because it showed Britain that the colonies were getting ready to form their own rule. I agree with the idea of writing a letter to England because it would tell the King that there were some people that didn’t agree with his ideas. If they hadn’t had the conference, I’m sure we would all still be British.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Dionna C
2009-10-02 10:50:34

After the Revolutionary War, a continental congress was conferrred to decide upon America’s first form of a constutution. John Dickinson proposed a series of Articles known as the Articles of Confederation. Remembering the struggles they’d had with British tyranny, they were reluctant to form a strong central government. The Articles reflected this fear. Under the Articles the states were sovereign and could basically make almost all their own decisions. Congress did not have the right to levy taxes, regulate commerce, or enforce its own laws. Many representatives opposed the Articles, and wanted a more nationalized constitution, but those who feared a tyrannical central government outnumbered them.
While the Articles of Confederation failed, they were still an important part of US history because they show that creating a new country after the war was not nearly as easy as it seems in third grade social studies. The members of the Continental Congress had to work by trial and error like many of us, and in the end it took five years to get it right. It also reminds us that the members of the Continental Congress were human and that they made mistakes. I think that this makes them seem more real, so that they are more than just names and pictures in a textbook.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Priya P
2009-10-02 10:51:17

The First Continental Congress was a response by the colonists to the “Intolerable Acts” set by Britain. A delegate from each colony except for Georgia was sent to Philidelphia on September 5, 1774 in hopes of fighting back against the British and their unreasonable acts upon the colonists. This meeting was their hopes of defending themselves and their rights in means of passive rebellion. The result of this congress was a successful one, and the delegates all came to a consensus in which they agreed to boycott all British goods, and stop participating in trade with Britan until they agreed to compromise to tend to the colonists’needs. In the end, the delegates submitted all of their decisions that they made during the Congress and composed a petition to give to the king. The document included all of the complaints that they had in hopes of ending the struggles that they were facing and dealing with.
In my opinion, this was the right thing for the colonists to do. They had been dealing with these inconvieninces from the British for a great deal of time and they had not done anything about it to fight back. Instead of adressing the British officials primarily, they met to discuss their future actions before they did anything. The delegates all made sure that they agreed on everything that was to be done to ensure that they were all on the same page and had the same views on the occurances that were happening. After this, they still did not approach the situation in a violent way; they peacefully created a document including all of their concerns and presented it to Parliament. In my opinion, these acts were smart and avoided possible conflict.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Nilufar M.
2009-10-02 10:51:51

The First Continental Congress was held in Philadelphia in response to the “Intolerable Acts.” Delegates we sent from every colony except Georgia. The First Continental Congress endorsed a set of principles called the Suffolk Resolves which stated that the colonies did not need to follow the Coercive Acts. They also voted to boycott all British goods and to stop exporting goods to Britain until a reconciliation had been accomplished. Finally, a petition was sent to the king that defined all of their demands.
I believe that this is an important aspect of US History because it was one of the first ways that the colonies formally showed their dislike of the British rules. It united the colonies as one force against British rule. They did not want to completely end the role of Britain in the colonies, but they wanted to get rid of some of the acts that were imposed on them. I think that this was a precursor to the Revolution.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Melika Z.
2009-10-02 10:52:04

In 1774, Britain passed the “Intolerable Acts.” In response, the colonies decided to get together and have a meeting. Every colony, except Georgia, sent a delegate and they met on September 5, 1774 in Philadelphia. They had come together to figure out a way to defend the colonists’ freedoms and rights. There was much debate for what they should do, but finally they decided to boycott all British goods and write a petition to the king about all their grievances. This document presented to the King said that Parliment’s efforts to impose taxes on them and enforce laws and such were unconstitutional.

This meeting is important in US history, because it is the first meeting the colonists’ had to stand up against the King of England and his regulations imposed on the them. This meeting really showed that the colonists’ are willing to unite and stand up against the King and be quite defient of the King. It is also one of the event leading up the the American Revolution.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Arjun V.
2009-10-02 10:52:19

The Philadelphia Convention held in 1787 at Independence Hall was a significant time in US history. The fifty-five delegates from every state except Rhode Island met to discuss issues with the Articles of Confederation and how to balance the conflicting interests of large and small states. James Madison of Virginia proposed a plan where representation in Congress was proportional to the state’s population. Additionally, his plan gave so much power to a strong central government that one delegate immediately saw that the Virginia Plan was designed “to abolish the State Governments altogether”. William Paterson of New Jersey proposed a contradictory plan where representation was equal for all the states. The delegates discussed these two plans for a long time, but finally a compromise was reached. A bicameral legislature was enforced where the House of Representatives was based on the state’s population, and the Senate was formed where each state got equal representation.

When looking at the events that took place at this convention, I believe that the delegates took a very diplomatic approach to this issue. Instead of getting all heated up and fighting about which plan was better, they were able to discuss with each other and finally come up with a compromise. This compromise has continued for over three hundred years, and is still in use today. I find it amazing how these fifty-five delegates were able to create a government that has been able to stand up for all these years. My perception of this whole thing is that I kind of lean towards the Virginia Plan. I believe that representation should be based on population because a state with more people needs to have a bigger voice because the delegates are representing more people. Still, I am glad that the little dispute between the colonies did not flame up, and that they were able to solve the issue in a mannerly form.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Sonia I. - 4th period
2009-10-02 10:52:39

Formalizing a Confederation
The Articles of Confederation was the first important step in creating the United States’ first government. John Dickinson wanted to have a proposal for a national constitituion, which became the Articles of Confederation. The main points of the documents were that each state would have it’s own governement. The national government would be very weak, meaning that there was no executive or judicial system. Also, no one would be in charge of military affairs or in any financial affairs. The Artical of Confederation led to a weakened U.S government.

I can understand why the Americans feared a national government since they just had left Britain. However, it was obvious that the government would not last long because there is no center or national government. Every state was its own individual country. It would be impossible to buy anything in a different state. Also, if there was another war, the colonies would have failed to gather everyone to go to war. Although the articles of confederation was a weak government, it led to the creation of the Constitution.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Aimee S.
2009-10-02 10:55:18

The First Continental Congress was a meeting of 56 delegates from 12 of the 13 colonies of the New World that occurred on September 5 of 1774 in Philadelphia; Georgia was the only colony not to send a committee to the conference. The objective of the congress was to establish a way to maintain the rights of the colonists, and this began with the Suffolk Resolves, which was a proposition which states points about the colonists’ rights. It said that the colonists did not need to obey the Coercive Acts, that if an attack by royal troops was to take place that the colonies should act defensively, and that taxes should be taken by a provisional government until the Massachusetts charter was restored. Other issues were discussed and resolved, such as the issue pertaining to exporting and importing of British goods. However, some of the delegates (mostly representing the middles colonies) defied these resolutions due to a fear that they would cause more issues with Britain. Lastly, the delgates wrote a petition to the King reasserting their views and orders on the subject.

In my opinion, this conference further ignited the conflicts between the colonies and Britain. The delegates there were able to combine their views of independence, and write a letter stating those views to the King. This also led to rebellion of the colonists because it sparked a sense of freedom that they wanted. This historical event is important when studying the causes of the American Revolution because it was a catalyst to the revolution; the delegates, apart from an opposing few, agreed upon their views of a sense of independence and priviliges, and this sparked a need for rebellion and opposition.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Marquita M.
2009-10-02 10:55:44

This text describes the start of the First Continental Congress. I was assembled on September 5, 1774 and was a gathering of the colonies to discuss the issues within the colonies and britian. All of the colonies sent there most prominent politicans to dissus these problems. One important situation was the boycott of all british goods and the cease of exporting of most goods to Britian and its West Indian possessions. Also they discussed the bad things associated with the Coercive Acts.

This is important because it shows the colonies showing responsiblity for thier future nation. They show there independence and how they don’t need the british help anymore. The british try to control future America and the First Continental Congress shows there intolernce for this, by not accepting the british goods.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Angel W
2009-10-02 10:55:46

Formalizing a Confederation (p. 180)

The citizens of the newly founded country of America had fears that their government would be overtaken by a major centralized government. To try to prevent this from happening, Congress adopted a version of John Dickinson’s proposal, later called the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The document was weakened to prevent a major centralized government. Basically, each state had its own government. They were considered to be separate states first, then the United States second. The Articles of Confederation did not have the power to tax the states or regulate commerce. It did not include an executive or judicial branch; it only had a single-chamber Congress, with each state having one vote. The document was ratified by all thirteen states in 1781, giving the nation its first formal government. Because the Americans were fearful of a strong centralized government, the Articles of Confederation were very limited in power.
I think the colonists did not want a major central government because there would be a chance of one person taking over, and then they would have to live under a monarchy style of government, which is what they had just broken away from. I would like to view John Dickinson’s original version of the Articles of Confederation because the colonists accepted a weaker version of the Articles, which created a very weak central government. I think that with this Articles of Confederation did not unite the country at all. I believe that if the country was to keep the Articles of Confederation, not only would the country be in major debt, but the states may even start to fight each and war with each other because there were different governments for each state. The states could fight each other and eventually, the country would be in disaster.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Natasha j.
2009-10-02 10:58:10

The Articles of Confederation was created by John Dickinson after he refused to sign the Declaration of Independence. He continued to stay in Congress and construct a proposal called the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The Confederation reserved each state the rights of freedom, sovereignty, and independence. It also made a government that the citizens were of their state first then citizens of America second. In the single-chamber congress, each state had one vote and the congress had to ask for approval of taxes. It did not provide an executive branch. In 1781 all thirteen state legislatures had ratified the Confederation.
In my opinion, this event was important because it gave Americans some good ideas about how they should run their country. At first the A of C had interesting points along the rights of freedom which is good for the people. On the other hand, the Confederation gave the military weakness. Overall even though the Articles of Confederation was flawed, it paved the way for future laws.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Zach D.
2009-10-02 10:58:30

The First Continental Congress convened in Philadelphia to protest the Intolerable Acts. Many of the men present supported the Suffolk Resolves and demanded that they get respect from the British. Because of this belief, they protested the Coercive Acts, held the belief that they should decide their taxes, and set up the necessary infrastructure for the defense of the colonies. Also, to protest the Intolerable Acts they boycotted all of the British goods and ceased sending anything to England. Not all colonists were so bold, and especially the Middle Colonies wanted to find a compromise. However, the message was sent after much protest to King George III.
I would not have been as brash as these colonists, but this was a crucial first step towards independence. If they had not stood up to England in this case, the colonies may have forever stayed colonies under England, where they would have been taxed without representation. This was not a fully angry and independent statement, so they gave the King a chance to back off with honor, but they also made their intentions clear.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Jade T.
2009-10-02 10:59:23

Topic: First Continental Congress
On September 5, 1774 the first continental congress was held. This was a meeting of fifty six delegates that came from each of the thirteen colonies. The only colony that did not attend this meeting was Georgia. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss information about the rights of the citizens. During this meeting all of the delegates had the opportunity to express their opinions about certain matters. Massachusetts was the colony in which the first continental congress met. The citizens of Massachusetts were in an uproar over a document known as the Suffolk Resolves. This document contained several principles, by which the first continental congress opened their meeting with. The resolve stated that the colonies should not have to abide by rules that forced them to pay taxes until another Massachusetts charter was created. The continental congress decided to rebel against Britain until a negotiation was made. Although there were people who agreed with what the continental was trying to accomplish, there were many people who did not agree with the plan.
I think that the first continental congress tried its best to help the colonies. They did everything in their ability to improve the rights of the colonies. I think that the colonies would have been helped more if the king would have more attentive to what they wanted. In addition to this I think that it was good that the colonies stood up for what they believed in instead of not expressing their opposition.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Joshuah B.
2009-10-02 11:00:11

Topic 1: Page 151, “The First Continental Congress”

The First Continental Congress met in Philadelphia on September 5, 1774. The more prominent colonial politicians that attended included: Samuel and John Adams, John Jay, Joseph Galloway, John Dickenson, Patrick Henry, Richard Lee, and George Washington. In total, 56 delegates congregated to discuss the defense of the colonist’s rights. The Suffolk Resolves enacted a passive form of rebellion in Massachusetts. These colonists declared that they owed no obedience to any of the Coercive Acts. They suggested that a provisional government be set up for military defense and maintenance purposes. The continental congress agreed and also voted to boycott all British goods after 1775. Not all delegates however agreed with these decisions. These “trimmers,” as John Adams Labeled them, opposed these aggressive acts and wanted to avoid international turmoil. They tried in vain to overturn the decisions already reached, and unsuccessfully suggested alternatives. All demands were summarized and sent as a petition to the King, in an effort to dispose of those who were responsible for the Coercive acts.
This event is important to understanding the history of the formation of the United States of America. It symbolized one of the first acts of freedom and rebellion against the tyranny of England. This event further signaled the importance of a smooth transition into a new form of government. These men also turned out to be some key leaders in the events that followed in the next few years after the congregation. They accumulated non-aggressive demands in an attempt to improve their ruling government, but since those demands “could not” be met an entirely new government had to be formed. Without this continental congress, the revolution might have never been won by the Americans.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Saiful K.
2009-10-02 13:35:25

Topic 2: Formalizing A Confederation

The Americans need a formal orgganized government during the American Revolution, so in 1776 John Dickinson drafted a proposal for a constitution. Congress decided to use a weaker version entitled the Articles of Confederation and the Perpetual Union. This first governning document gave states much of the power and as the name implied, was a loose confederation of states instead of an organized national government. The Articles created of a one-housed Congress with states having equal representation. It also did not allow the national government to tax; simply allowing it to ask the states for aid. Congressional committees controlled dimplomatic and military affairs, and a seperate judicial system kept the national government in check. In 1781 all thirteen states ratified the new Articles of Confederation. It gave our nation its name, the “United States of America.” The articles spoke explicitly of states cooperating and interacting, but without federal involvment.

I think the Articles of Confederation had a wide array of weaknesses that hindered the United States. However, the Articles were written at a time of war to stabilize and consolidate America against Great Britain. As they were at the moment fighting the tyrannical rule of a monarchy, it would be rather hypocritical to establish a strong federal government. Instead, it allowed a loose confederacy of states to cooperate amongst each other. Later; however, as the nation was hot off of its victory and independence, its infrastructure was very weak, especially financially. This is extremely important to study in U.S. history because it was pivotal in the establishment of our current government and U.S. Constitution. Without the errors of the Articles of Confederation to guide them, the Founding Fathers may not have been able to make the Constitution as great and workable as it was.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Ryan H.
2009-10-02 13:36:26

The continental congress was a group of delegates that represented all of the colonies except Georgia that met in response to the “Intolerable Acts”. They met in order to find a way to defend their rights against Britain together. Some of the things they mandated was a boycott of all British goods and the ceasing of exporting goods to Britain. This was enforced by local committees, which basically were taking power from Britain. Some people were not in favor of these mandates, primarily middle colony representatives, because they didn’t want a conflict with Britain. The Continental Congress summed everything up into a document that they sent to King George III, rather than to Parliament.
My opinion is that this event was pivotal to the beginnings of the American Revolution and that we wouldn’t be free unless this occurred. This event was one of the first blatant acts of defiance to the British crown and can tell us a lot of things about the times. It wasn’t blatant opposition, it was blatant resistance, as the book says. I agree with this and I think that it was very important for the Continental Congress to meet and begin to form an inter-colony relationship that was fundamental in winning the war. Without this sort of co-reliance, the colonies would have fallen apart by themselves. It also laid the basis to our democratic government and the way we vote on important, intelligent delegates to represent us in Congress.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Rebekke M.
2009-10-02 13:37:27

The First Continental Congress

The First Continental Congress was a meeting of all thirteen of the original American colonies, except Georgia; they met as a response to the Coercive Acts, or to the colonists they were known as the Intolerable Acts. In this conference the delegates decided that they would boycott all British goods and also they would no longer export almost all goods to Britain. Together they thought that they did not need to follow any of the Coercive Acts. Along with these decisions they also thought up that they would instead pay all their taxes to a provisional government instead of to the Parliament and England, until they gave them what they wanted. At this conference they wrote up a petition to the king, not Parliament, it said that Parliament had this power, but all the things that they had been doing and ordering upon the colonies were unconstitutional.
This event in history is important to history because it was a time which the colonists were making a move to go against the crown and say that they would be pushed around no longer. There had been several events before, such as the Boston Tea Party by the Sons of Liberty, but this was a time when almost all the thirteen original colonies banded together to come up with a solution to the injustice that they felt. During this time period, it was a time for change and movements because they were not going to just sit around and watch Britain push them around any longer, the delegates and colonists decided that they would take matters into their own hands. This may have been the first time that the delegates and colonists all met together, but it definitely was not the last time. Times after this they would write up the Declaration of Independence and decide to separate from Britain, the mother country.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Shahroze A.
2009-10-02 13:41:09

The First Continental Congress met on Spetember 5, 1774 in response to the “Intolerable Acts” passed by Great Britain. I was comprised of delegates from all 13 colonies except for Georgia and addressed the issues concerning the American colonists. Delegates like John Adams and George Washington decided to boycott British goods and to cease exporting all goods to Britian. Another idea was the Grand Council, proposed by Joseph Galloway of Pennsylvania, a legislature that would share the authority to tax and govern the colonies with Parliament. However, the final decision was to write a letter compiling all of the complaints to the King instead of Parliament, a choice they felt was the most effective.

The coming togather of the American colonies showed the King a lot about what was going on in America. I think the most influential was the fact that they were actually able to come togather and direct their problems towards Britain effectively, but without aggression. The idea of actually writing a letter instead of another method I think plays a major role as well. The Colonists are formally telling Britain to back off without creating commotion or taking risks.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Emily P. 6th Period
2009-10-02 13:44:15

The First Continental Congress
The First Continental Congress was assembled on September 5th, 1774 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was attended by the fifty-six most well-known delegates of the colonial era, such as George Washington, Ben Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson. They met to retaliate against the recently passed “Intolerable Acts”. These acts were passed in reaction to the Boston Tea Party and had the purpose of shutting down Boston Harbor. They established that they were going to state the endorsements against Boston in a passive rebellion. They resisted the fact that a provisional governor had to collect taxes and they should create some form of defense in case of an attack by the British. These were called the Suffolk resolves. Some of the delegates resisted this radicality, but a consensus was eventually made when they decided to petition their demands to the king. It included the affirmation of Parliament’s control of commerce, and that powers including imposing taxes, enforcing laws through admiralty courts, suspending assemblies, and revoking charters were unconstitutional.

This is an important moment in the history of the United States, because it was the first formal gathering of politicians to resist the crown and complain their grievances. This proved to the king that the colonists were serious about their rights and they wanted him to know about it. This is why they directly addressed King George III about it rather than Parliament. It also shows the colonists could band together and make things work on their own other than depending on England for all the answers. The First Continental Congress was the colonist first baby steps towards their independence. They can make compromises, create documents, form a militia, and form a sort of governing body in a matter of weeks. This congress shows that America means business!

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Roberta S.
2009-10-02 13:49:08

The First Continental Congress
The First Continental Congress was held on September 5, 1774 in Philadephia which consisted of 56 delegates from different states. This event took place because the colonies needed to stop all the rebellion and hate towards Britain because of the issuing of the “Intolerable Acts.” These representatives were determined to protect the colonies and keep them from being overpowered by the British. The Congress was finding a variety of means of cutting off the exports and imports from Britain until the British had made a fair compromise with them. However, not all of the delegates were in favor of such an act but had to talk about the different options that they had and decide on one. In conclusion, they decided to write a petition which included all of their feelings and demands toward the king.
This Continental Congress was an important event in history because it brought together all of the people from the colonies and they were able to come up with the petition which stated everything that they wanted and needed. This is just one of the first steps towards writing the Declaration of Independence which would then lead to the complete independence from Britain’s power. All of the people who got together on September 5, 1774 must have been really brave in stepping up to take the spot as the representative of their state. They were risking their lives because of the power that Britain but were supporting the viewpoints of the majority of the people living in the colonies under British rule. When all of the representatives did not all agree to some of the demands, they had to compromise and make a document that they all could agree on. This showed how mature and reasonable the people were. Especially that they didn’t automatically choose to go to war with Britain but sat down to think out their options.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Kiah W
2009-10-02 13:50:35

The Articles of Confederation, created by John Dickinson, was the first constitution of the thirteen colonies. The fears of centralized authority and the possibilities for corruption caused the Articles of Confederation to be written. The Articles of Confederation allowed each state to exclusively possess “its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled” and instituted a form of government in which Americans were citizens of their states first and foremost, then citizens of the United States. According to the Articles, “the national government consisted of a single-chamber Congress, elected by the state legislatures, in which each state had one vote.” Congress was prohibited from enforcing taxes without a unanimous approval from the states. However, neither a judicial system nor an executive branch was established under the Articles of Confederation. In 1781, all states had approved the Articles of Confederation and an official form of government was now instituted.
The formalization of the Articles of Confederation is a significant part of American history. The Articles of Confederation are the first form of national government in America and is the foundation on which upon America’s government was created. It allowed concord and structure within the thirteen states. Without the Articles of Confederation, present-day American society and government would be substantially different and the course of American history would have been inexplicably altered also.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Inesha P.
2009-10-02 13:59:21

Summary: Prominent delegates from across the thirteen colonies, save Georgia, convened as one uniform body– called the First Continental Congress– on September 5, 1774 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The men gathered in response to Britian’s enforcement of the “Intolerable Acts.” While many delegates were in favor of defiantly opposing Britain’s authority in the colonies, some delegates, such as John Jay and Joseph Galloway, sought to endorse a plan called the “Grand Council” through which the colonists could collaborate with the British Parliament regarding the enforcment of taxes and the management of government. However, the aforementioned men were not successfull in their diplomatic cause;and instead, the delegates decided to send a petition directly to King George III. The petition consisted of a list of principles and demands from the colonists that argued that the British Parliament had no right to regulate imperial commerce and government. Furthermore, during this meeting, delegates adopted the Suffolk Resolves, of which avenged that the colonists owed no debt nor any obedience to their presumed mother country– Great Britain.

Perceptions/Thoughts: This event is important for several reasons– primarily because it stands as testament to one of the first times when all the colonies united against Britain. Thus, in the history of this event, we see how it was that a young nation first gathered the gumption and the courage to go against its forbear. Furthermore, I percieve this event as a special starting point for change in our young country for it was during this first meeting that delegates felt comfortable enough to openly express their disgust and contempt for Britain; thus, here was born one of the greatest of American freedoms– that of freedom of speech. With respect to history, I think this event also showcases one particular motif that we find time and time again: the motif that out of chaos and disagreement, progress is born. Had it not been for the unification of the colonies at this important meeting, our young nation would not have been united enough nor strong enough in its ideology to engender a people and a Continental Army that, too, wanted complete independence from Britain.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Christian M,
2009-10-02 14:03:34

The first Continental Congress, assembled in September, 1774, consisted of 56 delegates gathered from the original thirteen colonies to discuss the appropriate action to take in regard of the Coercive Acts. The Coercive Acts, more popularly known as the Intolerable Acts, was issued by parliament in order to punish the colonists for their negatively physical response to the taxing of items (ie. The Boston Tea Party). Other than the Coercive Acts, the congress included several other events, such as the endorsing of the Suffolk Resolves. In the end, the Continental Congress decided to take up action against the Intolerable Acts in some ways. They declared that colonies owed no obedience to the Acts, that a provisional government should collect all taxes until the Massachusetts Charter was restored, that defense measures be taken in the event of attack from royal troops, and to boycott all British goods. They summarized their demands into a petition to the king, asking him directly to stop the Acts.

The First Continental Congress is a very important event in U.S. History as it marked one of the first signs of rebellion of the colonies against the Crown. The colonists were starting to be able to think for themselves and bite the hand that fed them; with reason of course. They were starting to feel that Parliament was over stepping its bounds in governing the colonies. This also marked on the first times that the colonies were collaborating together to achieve a goal beneficial to all of them, even though some disliked the idea of going against the crown. This event is important overall as it may have been a cornerstone leading to the American Revolution.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Brandon O.
2009-10-02 14:05:21

The Philadelphia Convention began in May of 1787 when fifty five delegates from every state except Rhode Island gathered at the Pennsylvania Sate House in Philadelphia. Its designated purpose was to revise the Article of Confederation, but also there was an option of eliminating the Articles and instituting a new national Constitution. The delegate operated in complete secrecy to ensure freedom of debate; one such debater was James Madison, who proposed the Virginia Plan, which would establish a strong central government and gave the majority of power and influence to the larger states. This raised a response from the smaller states, and the New Jersey Plan was introduced as a counter to the Virginia Plan, presenting a bicameral Congress where every state had an equal vote. This however, gave the smaller states, which possessed twenty five percent of the overall population, equal power with the larger states. This necessitated a compromise, which came with the Connecticut Compromise on July 17 which was the basis for the new United States Constitution. This Constitution was characterized by three different branches of government with a system of checks and balances, a strong central government that still retained power for the individual states, and a bicameral Congress with one house whose representation was equal for every state and one whose representation was based on population.
This is an incredibly important item in U.S. history; it came at a defining point, and had the potential to make or break the future of a newborn, ten year old country. The failure of the Articles of Confederation was a blow to the prosperity of the country, and the Philadelphia Convention was the opportunity the nation had to institute a plan that worked. If the Revolution was the most important event in the history of the formation of the United States, the Philadelphia Convention was the most important event for the future of the United States. The Convention also was important in other, less obvious ways: it presented what would become the nature of the country. It was a diverse convention, and conflicting ideas were presented and debated. The fact that the Convention didn’t dissolve into mutiny is a mark to the nature of the nation. There were open minded individuals and close minded individuals, but all had the best interests of the nation in mind.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Ankita S
2009-10-02 14:05:57

In 1787, every state, with the exception of Rhode Island, sent delegates to meet in Philadelphia. The purpose of the convention was to reform the Articles of Confederation. The Virginia plan, which proposed unlimited power to the government, also called for a bicameral legislature based on the population of the states. This plan was objected by the delegates of smaller states, such as William Patterson of New Jersey. He proposed a single-chamber congress in which each state has a fixed and equal vote. In the end, a compromise was created to have a bicameral legislature: representation for the upper house is fixed; representation for the lower house is on population. This compromise was later called the Connecticut Compromise. To ensure the separation of powers, it was decided that the member of one branch could not elect a member of another branch. At the end of the convention, a constitution was created. This constitution, after going through the tedious process of ratification, then became the official Constitution of the United States.

I believe that this topic in history is extremely important. This convention produced the structure and the laws of the government which we live by today. The delegates, who had an opportunity to be as unconventional and conspiratorial as possible, acted in a very diplomatic manner. Because, this congress was closed to the public, the delegates could have opted to propose and ratify beliefs that would have led to the ruin of the nation. Instead, they acted in a diplomatic and educational manner to form a consensus. This convention marked the day in history, when a confederation of states became a union with a strong founding government. In my opinion, and in many others’ also, the occurrence of this convention was very important. Without this, this country might still be run by a chaotic and unsuccessful government.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Sadie D.
2009-10-02 14:11:53

After the Revolution, an infantile, war ravaged America set out to establish a constitutional government to institute authority in the new sovereign nation. The process was one that lasted approximately four years, from 1777 to 1781. Many of its signers were reluctant which, in turn, caused multiple ratifications to the proposed drafts of the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. Ultimately, a weakened document was produced. This document allowed for little centralized control, giving the power to each individual state. Many problems arose from this agreement. The national government was not able to affectively tax, nor was it able to regulate commerce. It, also, could not affectively implicate a judicial government and enforce the laws. This weakened central government was, more or less, an effect of the mindset that a central government would not act in the interest of the people, an idea produced by the English parliament before and during the revolutionary war.
The events leading up to and contributing to the document’s ratification played a large part in understanding of why the power was distributed as it was. The men involved in the writing of the original document were in fear of another imbalance of power caused by a centralized government. Because of this, they created a weak, ineffective central government, despite the fact that many of them predicted the consequences of such (visions p.180). This demonstrates how large of an affect the war and the prior treatment of the colonist had on establishing our initial government systems. It also brings forth the question of whether or not these influences have carried over to the present government system. The Articles display a prudent, maybe even desperate, desire for equality and fair treatment in the American government.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Michael A.
2009-10-02 14:27:15

The 1787 Philadelphia Convention was the gathering of fifty-five delegates. The result of the Convention was the United States Constitution, the oldest Constitution ever. It came shortly after delegates from five states proposed that Congress meet to amend the Articles of Confederation. The Convention featured representatives from every state except Rhode Island .The Convention began in May of 1787 in the Pennsylvania State House. The most influential delegate of the Convention was James Madison of Virginia. The young, politically astute delegate proposed his plan which included the establishment of a powerful central government. The Virginia Plan, as it was called, would give Congress the right to make legislation and taxation through a bicameral legislature. Madison believed that each state should have representation in both houses based on population. In opposition, William Paterson of New Jersey offered up his own “New Jersey Plan” that called for equal representation for all states. Both plans called for Congress to have more legislative power. The delegates entered into a period of intense discussion. They finally compromised and developed the Constitution which consisted equally of both parties ideals for government.
The assembling of the delegates was very important and is still very relevant. Today, all three branches of government meet to propose and enforce legislation. The President addresses Congress several times in an annual State of the Union speech. Congress also meets regularly to propose and enforce legislation. I believe that the process of comprise is the most significant part of the Philadelphia Convention. If the delegates did not meet and decided to propose plans from afar, it would have been much harder to agree on a single plan.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Comment by Jasmine C.
2009-10-06 20:28:33

The topic I chose for this assignment is “The First Continental Congress” on page 151. The First Continental Congress was basically one of the first meetings to talk about issues and to solve problems the colonists faced with Great Britain. In this excerpt, every colony sent delegates, except Georgia, to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia in order to converse about the “Intolerable Acts” that Britain enforced on the colonists. The Congress got together on September 5th, 1774 to deal with the current issue. Among the Congress men were many prominent politicians of that time. Some of these included: Samuel from Massachusetts, John Jay from New York, Patrick Henry and George Washington from Virginia. In other words, the 56 delegates attending the meeting came together to defend the rights of the colonies and the colonists. It was declared that the colonies did not owe an obedience to any of the Coercive Acts. Coercive Acts states that “a provisional government would collect all taxes until the former Massachusetts charter was restore and defense measure would be taken in the event of an attack by the royal troops”. The congress also agreed to vote on “boycotting all British goods until December 1st and to stop exporting almost all goods to Britain and its West Indian possessions after September 1775 unless a reconciliation has been accomplished”. This agreement between the colonists was known as the Continental Association that would be enforced by local committees of “observation” or “safety”. However, even though many of the delegates agreed on these terms, some did not. Politicians that were from the middle- colonies feared that the internal turmoil would result in a head- on confrontation with Britain. These known politicians opposed the fact that the colonies would not import or export with Britain and tried to win the argument of Galloway’s plan, which was known as the “Grand Council”. This idea was an American legislature that would share the authority to tax the govern the colonies with Parliament. Nevertheless, this was unsuccessful. However, the colonists did come to a conclusion. The conclusion did allow Parliament to regulate imperial commerce, but it argued that imposing taxes, enforcing laws, suspending assemblies, and revoking charters were unconstitutional. A method that chose to convey the message was to talk directly to the King, George III, who would end the crisis by dismissing the people responsible for the Coercive Acts.

The First Continental Congress was an important factor in American history because it provided the first official meeting to discuss issues. If it were not for this meeting, the delegates that arrived from the different colonies would not have had the opportunity to discuss the issues and come up with a solution. In other words, the United States of America would not be an independent country if it were not for this meeting. The delegates also collaborated about the different things that needed to be fixed. This is a sense of foreshadowing because at this meeting, the delegates were taking control and making sure their needs were fulfilled first before anyone else’s.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
Name
E-mail
URI
Your Comment (smaller size | larger size)
You may use <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong> in your comment.